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The Wrap tells us today (emphasis in bold is mine):

….A week after Cate Blanchett railed against the lack of quality roles for women in mainstream Hollywood films, new data proves the “Blue Jasmine” Oscar-winner’s point.

A comprehensive study by San Diego State’s Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film determined that women represented only 15 percent of protagonists in the 100 top-grossing films of 2013, 29 percent of major characters, and 30 percent of all speaking characters. Further, only 13 percent of those films had either an equal number of major female and male characters, or more major female characters than male characters, the study called “It’s a Man’s (Celluloid) World” found….

As an author, it is worth pondering that issue. Of course I sought to write the best novel I could. I hoped also to write one appealing both to women and men as readers.

I did not set out aiming to achieve any particular “male-female ratio,” yet, overall, I believe I ended up with a pretty good – and realistic – balance. I open with a relatively evenly presented male/female relationship, and, along the way, as additional characters appear, many of them turn out to be women. Ultimately the number of prominent women probably outnumber prominent men.

I have just tried determining that “breakdown” for myself while sitting here writing this post. It’s not actually all that easy. Depending on how one counts, I would estimate Passports has rather more than half a dozen major women (of varied ages and several nationalities), and slightly fewer numbers of comparable men. I don’t think the novel perhaps having a few more women characters is exceptionally obvious story-wise either.

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Ahem. So big budget, high-powered, film producers out there take note: there are plenty of women’s major speaking film roles here! ;-)

I do apologize about one clear omission, though. There are no vampires. Sorry.

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