Death and Social Media

On Wednesday, before I left Pennsylvania, I emailed my wife the 80 percent finished sequel manuscript. “I just want you to have a copy,” I messaged her. I didn’t say it in so many words, but she guessed why.

We nodded to it after I returned. I’d had a chill. If anything had happened to me on the trip back to London, I wanted her to have the unfinished book. Someone else she chose could’ve eventually finished it. A year of my hard work so far – and especially all “of myself” and others I’d shared within its pages – would not have been lost forever on my death.

Thinking on that caused me to reflect on that in terms of social media too.

Naturally my wife had had our late girlfriend Kam’s number stored in her phone. I don’t know if she has deleted it and I won’t even ask. And Kam never did Facebook or Twitter, so we don’t even have the likes of those to hold on to.

One of my Facebook friends is a cousin who died in 2010. I will never unfriend him. His page is now essentially a running memorial of wall postings “to him” on his birthdays and other occasions.

You probably have similar stories.

Inevitably this will get worse. Abruptly anything on Facebook, Twitter, or another personal site, could be the last post we ever make. Maybe that’s morbid to bring up, yet it is always worth bearing that in at least the back of our minds.

Free Stock Photo: Girl working on a laptop.

Free Stock Photo: Girl working on a laptop.

Interesting too is how, as years and then decades pass, those who live after us will have masses of “information” about us due to our social media legacies – more than any ancestors had ever left behind before. Essentially, future generations won’t have trouble finding out about us. In fact, we’ll probably bore the hell out of them.

Who’ll need a “Who Do You Think You Are?” TV show two centuries from now? After all, those uploaded photos of you drinking those four beers out of straws via that stupid device sitting on your head, will still be easily accessible for all to see. Nothing like leaving the likes of that as a profound “family history” to the great-great-grandchildren, eh? ;-)

An Airport Welcome

So I’ve left my Dad in recovery in Pennsylvania from his August 9 heart failure. After two weeks there, it was time to leave: I could do no more, and I couldn’t stay forever of course. He looks excellent, and is in the (now calmer) hands of my mother and my sister.

Having flown into Newark back on August 14 was my first trans-atlantic flight alone since 1999 – pre-marriage. Flying back yesterday evening from Newark to Heathrow was obviously the second. We almost always fly British Airways – as I did for these flights too.

Some journeys are arduous. Others relatively easy. This was the latter.

There were no hassles with the car service to Newark Airport, no fuss at bag drop, no real wait at Security.

It was also a strange feeling prepping to fly alone across the Atlantic again.

The flight itself – on a 787 Dreamliner, which is quite a plane – was unremarkable. (Also, I noticed no one getting to know a row-mate rather, uh, well.)

After landing in London, matters were similarly routine: disembarked quickly, and UK border control moved smoothly. (Unlike last time, today’s passport officer – another woman – displayed absolutely no interest in my occupation.)

The luggage was on the reclaim carousel when I reached it. I exited and found myself so early – the flight had also landed early – that my “driver” on this end (my wife) had not yet arrived. I took a seat near one of the “meeting points” in Terminal 5.

Killing time, I checked email, Facebook, and decided to have a tweet. The tweet was (I thought) innocuous. However, it attracted a response from Heathrow Airport’s official Twitter feed:

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First time I’ve ever been welcomed by “an airport.” ;-)

Rip Van Winkle Wakes Up

It was widely reported the other day that when Facebook went down for a time, some of the web site’s users actually dialed 911. The L.A. Times noted:

Officials at one Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department station were not happy after getting calls from residents because Facebook went down Friday morning.

“#Facebook is not a Law Enforcement issue, please don’t call us about it being down, we don’t know when FB will be back up!” Sheriff’s Sgt. Burton Brink of the Crescenta Valley station wrote on Twitter. In a later tweet, he said an unknown number of people called 911 about the outage….

Notice how the Sheriff dealt with it? He went on Twitter. But if this from Media Bistro is accurate, that would not have helped:

The Smartest People Prefer Twitter To LinkedIn And Facebook, Research Shows [STUDY]

Meaning the Sheriff would have been addressing the wrong audience in terms of, err, brainpower. ;-)

I love Twitter…. although I’m not a genius. And I do also use Facebook – but primarily as a keep in touch with family and friends sort of thing; and I’m not on it much. (I’m not on LinkedIn at all.)

Which led me to thinking about where we are here: WordPress. When I first used it for another blog about 10 years ago, I had found it refreshingly straightforward.

However, when I returned to it last autumn to start this blog after several years’ break, I felt far more out of it than if in my absence someone had merely moved the furniture around. It seemed more like I had been dropped into another technological era. To borrow from Catskills literature, it felt rather Rip Van Winkle-ish.

Free Stock Photo: This early 1980\'s model of a portable computer was the Global Health Odyssey\'s Historical Object of the Month for August, 2004.

Free Stock Photo: This early 1980\’s model of a portable computer was the Global Health Odyssey\’s Historical Object of the Month for August, 2004.

On the Dashboard, very little was where I remembered it. There were vast changes throughout the site. Trying to navigate, I sat there utterly lost at first.

“What is that blue screen for? How do I get back to the Dash? I clicked on that, and it’s leading me here? And what the heck does THAT symbol mean?” (Uh, I didn’t always say “heck.”)

What happened to my Atari 800?

That was then. I now have matters under control. Well, mostly anyway. :-)

Have a good [grumble, grumble] Monday….

Time Zones

The world is more than ever a 24 hour place. Yet it is not entirely so 24 hour that you too may not have noticed a similar phenomenon. My Twitter goes relatively quiet during the U.S. overnight; but around 9am ET, as the country starts to get to work, my timeline becomes far busier.

Not that you are ever tweeting from work, of course! ;-) As an aside, if you use Twitter and you’d like to, follow me, and I’ll follow you back. (I happened to joke yesterday on Cas Blomberg‘s blog about how I view Twitter.)

To our WordPress. I know many of you receive an email when a post appears here (thank you!), and, if you want to, you return and read that post when it’s most convenient based on where you are time-wise in your day. But I know lots of people use the WordPress reader. (Thank you again!) As with Twitter, that so many do causes me to wonder when are the better times to post on here?

I’ve seen more American and Canadian visitors turn up if I post around 9am ET – which is 2pm in London and 3pm CET. But if I do that, I get fewer European visitors. However, the reverse also seems the case: if I post 9am UK time, which is 4am ET US (1am in California), I get fewer North American visitors.

I have simultaneously also spotted some of you popping in from to the east of Europe – in southwest Asia, India, Singapore and Australia, etc. Naturally, a 9am ET US/ 2pm UK posting time means if you are in Asia and Australia, you see a post even later – the farther to the east, the later it is in your day….

….Or it can also be extremely early the following day! Sometimes, I wonder if some people ever sleep!? I always find it hilarious on here, or on Twitter, when I notice friends posting at about 3am where they are!

Let’s have some fun. On our “big blue marble,” where are you geographically? If you’d like to, let me (and the rest of us) know in a comment. I’ll start: currently I’m in Enfield, London, United Kingdom….

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….Oh, geez, did I just write “big blue marble?” I’ve just dated myself…. again! ;-)

Happy Thursday! Or Friday…. depending on your location!

Thanks For Sharing

I just wanted to “share” that I’ve noticed that the number of my posts “shared” to other social media – Twitter, Facebook, Digg, etc. – has “exploded” in recent days. My little literary site here has existed since December. Yet I have had upwards of half of my total shares since just last Friday.

10305_wpm_lowres

Since I’m not getting assailed by “sp@m” and “trolls,” it appears then that most of that recent uptick in “shares” indicate many of you are indeed “normal” human beings and actually do “like” what you see. ;-)

I extra-appreciate that because, as I’ve also explained recently (and in case you didn’t see that post), I can’t share my writing myself on most social media.

If you are new here, by way of introduction much of what I post is serious. It may be about my experiences in having written the first book, and now as I work on the sequel. Related issues come up as well. It may also be on life overseas, on study abroad, and on frequent fliers’ worst nightmare. I have also written about painful loss.

But it isn’t all “heavy” stuff. We do have to smile too. I’ve composed posts on many of the novel’s characters…. and a post on a certain person’s reaction to some of them. There have also been pieces on subjects such as travel, “pen pals,” and my novel unexpectedly stirring up memories of an office affair. The intimidating wildlife and glorious weather often found in the Catskills have also inspired posts.

I like to mix it up. I believe we shouldn’t tie ourselves only to the oh, so, serious side of things. (Assuming “tie” is, uh, the right word there?) There is no final exam at the end of the semester. Heck, there isn’t even a semester.

So I just want to say “thank you” for your shares, and also for your follows, and your continuing visits. :-)

Our “Basic Human Needs”

This was shared with me by my wife, who saw it someplace. It is simply too good not to pass on. It’s “Maslow’s hierarchy of needs” …. uh, modernized:

Maslow's new hierarchy of needs

Offered here with no further comment …. except for a ;-)

Now, back to work. Time for us all to stop messing around on the internet! :-)

When “I’ll Write Soon” Meant Actually Writing

CNN quoting first lady Michelle Obama in Beijing earlier this week, praising studying abroad as “citizen diplomacy”:

“I’m here today because I know that our future depends on connections like these among young people like you across the globe,” the first lady told an audience composed of Chinese and international students at Peking University.

“We believe that relationships between nations aren’t just about relationships between governments or leaders — they’re about relationships between people, particularly young people.”

She points out also that:

“You don’t need to get on a plane to be a citizen diplomat,” she said. “If you have an Internet connection in your home, school or library, within seconds you can be transported anywhere in the world and meet people on every continent.”

CNN notes that the first lady said she had never considered studying abroad. Yet she omits there that pre-internet “citizen diplomacy” had never been a choice between only study abroad or doing nothing. Apparently, she didn’t do this?

True, I suspect the internet must have largely undermined this among younger people today. But even if she has forgotten ye olden days, us other “older” folks vaguely remember them. Pre-internet, pre-Facebook, pre-Twitter, there was something called “pen pals.”

Gather ’round, young people, and I will share a small memory of decades ago. There was once a time teens and young adults wrote letters, usually long-hand, and on paper, to each other in distant lands. Usually they had found each other by registering their name, address and country, and interests, at agencies that facilitated pairing them up so they could get to know each other that way.

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When one of them wrote a letter, he or she would head for the local post office, and mail it. About a week or so later, their “friend” in a foreign country would find their foreign postal service had left it in the mailbox, or had slid it through the letterbox. After opening that letter and reading it, he or she would then compose a letter in response, go to the local foreign post office or postbox, and mail that letter.

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Such exchanges sometimes went on for years. “Pen pals” might also send each other photos (that were taken by cameras, using film; but that is a subject for another recalling ye olden days blog post), cassettes (again, for another post), (printed) books, (printed) newspapers, (printed) magazines, and even remember each other’s birthdays (using paper cards). They might eventually talk on the (landline) telephone, and perhaps, on very rare occasions, have even someday met in person. :-)